Complete List Of LGAs In Borno State, Capital, And LGA Chairmen

LGA In Borno State, Capital, And LGA Chairmen
S/N
Local Government Area
Capital
Chairman
1
Abadam
Malam Fatori
Hon. Mustapha Kagu
2
Askira/Uba
Gwoza
Abubakar .U. Mazhinyi
3
Bama
Bama
Hon. Tijani Africana
4
Bayo
Bayo
Haruna Aliyu Chibra
5
Biu
Biu
Hon. Usman Ali Dika
6
Chibok
Chibok
Alh. Ibrahim Chibok
7
Damboa
Damboa
Modu Danladi
8
Dikwa
Dikwa
Rawa Gana Modu
9
Gubio
Gubio
Hon. Zanna Modu Gubio
10
Guzamala
Gajiram
Hon. Lawan Umara Zannah
11
Gwoza
Gwoza
Abdullahi Dan Jato
12
Hawul
Hawul
Daniel Musa Malang
13
Jere
Warabe
Hon. Bulama Kyari
14
Kaga
Benisheikh
Mustapha Bukar Daima
15
Kala/Balge
Rann
Bishara Musa Lawan
16
Konduga
Konduga
Hon. Bulama Gana
17
Kukawa
Kukawa
Mohammed Kyari
18
Kwaya Kusar
Kwaya Kusar
Salisu Adamu Yanga
19
Mafa
Mafa
Buka Umara Zulum
20
Magumeri
Magumeri
Lawan Modu Ngamma
21
Maiduguri
Maiduguri
Bakare Ali Kotoko
22
Marte
Marte
Ali Shittima Marte
23
Mobbar
Damasak
Hon. Modu Abatcha
24
Monguno
Monguno
Gadau Ali Monguno
25
Ngala
Ngala
Alh. Bukar Abatcha
26
Shani
Shani
Dr. Samaila Garba Shani
27
Nganzai
Rann
Hon. Mohammed Bulama

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What Is The Capital City Of Borno State?

The capital city of Borno State is Maiduguri. Maiduguri is located in northeastern Nigeria, on the continent of Africa. It serves as both the capital and the largest city of Borno State.

Maiduguri was founded in 1907 as a military outpost by the British Empire during the colonial period. As of 2022, Maiduguri is estimated to have the highest population of approximately 791,200.

The city sits along the seasonal Ngadda River, which disappears into the Firki swamps in the areas around Lake Chad.

Maiduguri has a significant history, being home to the Kanem-Bornu Empire for centuries. The city is characterized by its diverse ethnic makeup, with residents predominantly being Muslim, including Kanuri, Hausa, Shuwa, Bura, Marghi, and Fulani ethnic groups.

Additionally, there is a considerable Christian population and people from Southern states such as the Igbo, Ijaw, and Yoruba.

Maiduguri has faced challenges due to Islamist violence, particularly from the Boko Haram insurgency. Since the mid-1960s, the city has witnessed outbreaks of large inter-religious riots and has been the target of numerous attacks by Boko Haram militants.

Despite these challenges, Maiduguri remains a regional trading hub for northeastern Nigeria, with its economy largely based on services and trade.

The city is also home to various higher educational institutions, including the University of Maiduguri, Borno State University, Ramat Polytechnic, and several colleges providing specialized education in fields such as health, agriculture, and Islamic studies.

Maiduguri also boasts sports and leisure facilities, including the El-Kanemi Warriors football team and the Kyarimi Park zoo, attracting visitors from across the region.

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Which Is The Biggest Local Government In Borno State By Population?

NoLocal Government AreaPopulation (2020)
1Maiduguri791,200
2Gwoza405,200
3Bama395,800
4Ngala346,500
5Jere306,400
6Kukawa297,900
7Biu257,500
8Konduga230,500
9Gubio221,700
10Askira/Uba210,000
11Magumeri205,500
12Damboa341,700
13Hawul176,900
14Marte189,600
15Shani148,000
16Abadam146,600
17Nganzai145,200
18Mafa151,800
19Monguno160,900
20Dikwa153,900
21Mobbar170,900
22Kaga131,900
23Chibok97,200
24Bayo115,900
25Guzamala140,600
26Kwaya Kusar83,100
27Kala/Balge89,100

Historical Changes To Borno State LGAs

Borno State’s local government areas (LGAs) have undergone several changes since their establishment. Originally, Borno Province, as it was known before 1976, was a vast territory encompassing a much larger area than the current Borno State.

Following Nigeria’s independence, the region witnessed a gradual administrative restructuring process. In 1976, Borno State was created with a smaller territory and a fewer number of LGAs compared to today.

Over the years, the government implemented various reforms aimed at improving local administration and service delivery.

This often involved the creation of new LGAs from existing ones. Factors like population growth, geographical considerations, and the need for better representation of local communities often drove these decisions.

For instance, the LGA of Askira/Uba was created in 1996 from the former Askira LGA. Similarly, Kwaya Kusar LGA emerged from the split of the former Kwaya LGA in 1996.

These divisions aimed to bring government services closer to the people and address the specific needs of diverse communities within the state.

However, historical changes to LGAs haven’t been without controversy. Some argue that the frequent creation of new LGAs can place a strain on resources and lead to administrative inefficiency.

There have also been concerns about the political motivations behind some boundary adjustments. Understanding the historical context of Borno State’s LGAs sheds light on the state’s administrative development and its efforts to meet the evolving needs of its population.

Reference Sources:

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